City Hall to Reopen to the Public on Thursday, June 25th More Info»

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Poughkeepsie City Hall to Reopen to the Public on Thursday, June 25th

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison announced today that City Hall will reopen to the public on Thursday, June 25th. New health and safety protocols will be in place to protect citizens and staff

  1. Some Departments will operate by appointment only, in order to assure social distancing is adhered to, and in order to ensure that members of the public may conduct their business swiftly, and spend as little time as possible in the building. Mayor Rolison said: “No one liked to wait in line even before the Coronavirus hit, and anything we can do to ensure our citizens get served promptly is job-one in the post-COVID world of public service.” City Administrator, Marc Nelson, said “the days of taking a number or standing around waiting one’s turn are over, and visitors to City Hall will be having an entirely better experience than they may have had in the past.”
  2. Face coverings will be required when conducting business at City Hall. Staff is required to wear a mask when interacting with customers, and at all times during the work-day when unable to practice social distancing, and when using elevators even if alone.
  3. Enhanced daily cleaning has been implemented as well as regular “deep cleaning” of City Hall, the Court and Police Department, including all public areas.
  4. Sanitizer stations have been positioned throughout the building for public use.
  5. Parking for citizens and visitors to City Hall will be free in the underground garage, which will be open from 8:00AM until 5:00PM, Monday through Friday.

No appointment is required to visit the City Cashier, Parking Division, or City Chamberlain, all located on the ground floor, however the public is strongly encouraged to make payment for all city services by mail, or online, or to use the drop-box located in front of entrance to the police department on the north side of City Hall.

City Hall Hours of Operation: 8:30am to 4:30pm, Monday-Friday

Appointment Necessary

  • Building Inspector
  • Code Enforcement Officers
  • Economic & Community Development
  • City Assessor
  • Planning & Zoning

No Appointment Necessary

  • Cashier – Tax, Water, Sewer & Sanitation
  • City Chamberlain (except for marriage licenses)
  • Parking Enforcement & Permits
  • Mayor, City Administrator
  • Community Engagement

Appointments may be made online at:  https://cityofpoughkeepsie.com/appointment

Payments should be made via the city website: https://cityofpoughkeepsie.com/finance/payments/ or by mail to: 62 Civic Center Plaza, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 12601, or by using the drop box near the front door of the Police Station on Mansion Street.

Residents may contact city staff and officials by phone, and a contact list is available at https://cityofpoughkeepsie.com/contact-the-city-of-poughkeepsie.

City Providing Coronavirus Updates, Creates Resource Guide

The City of Poughkeepsie is continually updating the public on information pertaining to the coronavirus (COVID-19) and has created a resource guide. The city’s coronavirus webpage includes information from federal, state and Dutchess County resources, in addition to informing the public about how to contact city departments during this time. Information ranging from health and food distribution to aid for businesses and nonprofits can be found on the webpage at cityofpoughkeepsie.com/coronavirus.

Coronavirus Update: Mayor Outlines How to Reach City Services

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison announced steps today to limit the local government workforce to essential employees in light of the coronavirus (COVID-19).

The mayor emphasized that essential workers — including public safety and the sanitation department — will be continuing their shifts. The mayor said there will be no physical public access to City Buildings until further notice.

“These are extraordinary times,” Mayor Rolison said. “We are taking these actions to help slow the spread of this virus, while maintaining public safety and as many services possible.”

The mayor said the first round of nonessential workers will go on paid leave for two weeks effective Wednesday, and another round will go on paid leave for two weeks starting April 1.

Non-essential employees are considered any person who does not need to be physically present to perform their job functions, or they are not currently required to meet the core functions of city government during this response.

Contact Information

If you have an emergency situation, please call 911. Otherwise, the Police Department’s non-emergency number is 845-451-4000.  

Between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., you will be able to contact via phone the following departments:

  • Assessor: 845-451-4039
  • Building, Planning and Community Development: 845-451-4007
  • Office of the Mayor: 845-451-4073
  • City Chamberlain: 845-451-4276
  • Corporation Counsel: 845-451-4065
  • Finance Department and Tax Collector: 845-451-4030
  • Public Works: 845-451-4111

Applications for Section 8 Housing must be made in person at 1 Civic Center Plaza between 9 a.m. and noon Monday through Friday. You can call 845-451-4020 for more information.

Payments for city services also can be done through the website at https://cityofpoughkeepsie.com/finance, by mail at 62 Civic Center Plaza, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 or by using the drop box near the front door at the Police Station on Mansion Street.

Mayor Rolison has cancelled other public meetings scheduled for this and next week. The mayor encourages residents to follow the city’s social media platforms for updates. He also urged the public to get the latest updates on the COVID-19 and the impacts on our area at the county website at https://www.dutchessny.gov/Departments/DBCH/2019-Novel-Coronavirus.htm

City of Poughkeepsie Takes Measures to Lessen Potential Impact of COVID-19

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison announced that City Hall will be closing at 3 p.m. today in preparation for a deep cleaning to the facility over the weekend.

“Due to the evolving situation involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) issue, we feel it is prudent to take these steps at this time,” the Mayor said.

The Mayor said he is encouraging the public to avoid all but essential trips to City Hall when it reopens on Monday. Residents can contact City officials by phone, and a list of appropriate contacts is available at https://cityofpoughkeepsie.com/contact-the-city-of-poughkeepsie and by using the various tabs at that link to find the appropriate department.

Payments for city services also can be done through the website at https://cityofpoughkeepsie.com/finance/, by mail at 62 Civic Center Plaza, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 or by using the drop box near the front door at the Police Station on Mansion Street.

“While we understand this will be an inconvenience for people in some instances, we believe it is a wise decision at this time,” the Mayor said. The Common Council has cancelled its meeting set for Monday, and the Mayor has cancelled other public meetings scheduled for next week.”

The Mayor encourages residents to follow the city’s social media platforms for updates.

He also noted that to get the latest updates on the COVID-19 and the impacts on our area, the public should go to https://www.dutchessny.gov/Departments/DBCH/2019-Novel-Coronavirus.htm.

Poughkeepsie Arts Commission Seeks Member to Serve

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the City of Poughkeepsie Arts Commission is looking for a member to serve. Commission members must be city residents and either a working artist, arts professional or member of the community interested in the arts.

Those wishing to be considered for the position on the Public Arts Commission can send an email to [email protected]. Or can be dropped off to the City Chamberlain’s Office Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

 The commission was created in July of 2016 by Mayor Rob Rolison to advocate for the arts and raise awareness of local cultural offerings. The Hudson Valley has a rich artistic legacy dating back more than a century and the arts leave a multi-million dollar impact on Dutchess County economy.

Please submit all letters of interest no later than Friday, February 28, 2019 by 4:00 p.m.

City Hall Will Be Closed Monday, December 2, 2019

Due to inclement weather, Poughkeepsie City Hall will be closed Monday, December 2, 2019. The public hearing on the proposed 2020 budget and the Common Council meeting scheduled for Monday are both being postponed until Monday, Dec. 9. Emergency personnel and crews will continue in operation.

City of Poughkeepsie officials to Give Updates About Economic, Community Development at Chamber Breakfast

City of Poughkeepsie economic and community development officials will be the featured presenters at the Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce’s monthly breakfast in November.

Image of Paul Hesse,  Community Development Coordinator
and Paul Calogerakis, Economic Development Director
(left) Paul Hesse, Community Development Coordinator
(right) Paul Calogerakis, Economic Development Director

Paul Calogerakis, economic development director for the city, and Paul Hesse, community development coordinator for the city, will be providing updates on various projects and will take questions from the audience. The Chamber breakfast will be held from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20 at The Poughkeepsie Grand Hotel & Conference Center, 40 Civic Center Plaza.

The City has seen a considerable uptick in economic activity in the last few years, including new residential units and businesses.

“We have been making great strides,” said Mayor Rob Rolison. “I am looking forward to having part of our team here at City Hall give key details of what has been happening — and why it is good for the city.”

More than 1,200 housing units have been either recently completed or are under construction — and one third of them are below market rate. And one million square feet of commercial space has been recently completed, under construction or in the approval process.

City officials also say the Federal Opportunity Zone Program is attracting more interest from developers, people who want to invest in the city.

“The combined forces of greater personnel capacity at City Hall, Opportunity Zone tax legislation, creation of the Innovation District, abundant available real estate inventory and the high demand for housing has created a ‘perfect storm’ for development in the City of Poughkeepsie,” Calogerakis said.

A map of the City of Poughkeepsie Innovation District
A map of the City of Poughkeepsie Innovation District

Frank Castella Jr., president and CEO of the Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce, said, “The Chamber’s monthly breakfast events include presentations regarding economic issues that are relevant for our membership. With the growing number and scale of developments in the City of Poughkeepsie, we wanted to provide this update for our audience so they can see the increased level of activity that is happening in and around downtown.”

City officials recently created an Innovation District to streamline projects in the downtown area and are working to overhaul the City’s comprehensive plan and waterfront vision. As its finances have improved, the City has been able to leverage grant money from the state to undertake pedestrian safety and green infrastructure projects.

The City also has created an Anti-Blight Task Force that includes non-profit housing partners Habitat for Humanity of Dutchess County, Rebuilding Together Dutchess County, and Hudson River Housing. Since its inception in 2018, the task force has addressed more than 100 vacant properties. The City had slightly more than 600 in 2018; that number is now below 500. As part of this effort, the City also took ownership of the former YMCA site on Montgomery Street and has held three well-attended public meetings focusing on a community-minded reuse of the property.

Artist rendering of Catharine Street housing proposal 
(Image Credit: Kearney Realty & Development Group)
Artist rendering of Catharine Street housing proposal
(Image Credit: Kearney Realty & Development Group)

Hesse said, “The City’s been making strategic policy shifts, particularly with respect to planning and zoning, that have signaled our soundness for investment, and you’re now seeing the fruits of those policy shifts blossom.  At the same time, the City is now investing in places for people, undertaking meaningful improvements to public spaces that enhance the quality of life for residents.  We’re demonstrating our commitment to investing in our community, and the private sector is taking notice.”

Chamber members and guests will need to pre-register for the Contact Breakfast by visiting dcrcoc.org or calling 845.454.1700 x 1000. Tickets are $25 for members, and $35 for non-members.

City of Poughkeepsie Sets Public Information Session For YMCA Site Submissions

The City of Poughkeepsie will hold a public information session on Wednesday, Oct. 23 regarding possible future uses for the former YMCA site on Montgomery Street. The meeting will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Changepoint Church, 260 Mill St., Poughkeepsie.

In early September, the city released the four submissions it had received in connection to reuse of the site and then appointed an advisory committee that includes members of the public to review the applications and make recommendations to the administration.

Two of the respondents – one suggesting a Swimming Past the Boundaries Aquatic Center, the other seeking the creation of an arts museum – have subsequently withdrawn from the process.

Two others – one proposing a multi-use facility that would include community and recreational services, the other envisioning a Poughkeepsie Museum of Contemporary Art – are expected to make presentations to the public at the Oct. 23 meeting.

 “This has been an effective and open process,” said Mayor Rob Rolison. “The city took ownership of this property earlier this year after the site sat dormant for about a decade, and we are making great strides to bringing it back to life.”

As part of this process, city officials held two well-attended meetings and then answered dozens of questions the public posed at those meetings. The city also presented to the public a video showing extensive damage to the inside of the building that has been vacant for about a decade.

The 35 Montgomery Community Coalition has one of the remaining proposals. The coalition includes Community Matters 2, Inc., DAY ONE Early Childhood Learning Community, Dutchess Community College, Dutchess County, MASS Design Group, Nuvance Health, Poughkeepsie Farm Project, Poughkeepsie Public Library District, Vassar College, and YMCA of Kingston and Ulster County.

Andrew Gori and Ambre Kelly, co-founders of The They Co., have put forward the other remaining proposal calling for a contemporary arts museum.

At the public information session, each respondent will get 20 minutes to make a presentation and then answer questions from the public.

Members of the city’s YMCA Site Selection Advisory Committee also will be at the public information session. Mayor Rolison has appointed Dutchess County Legislator Barbara Jeter Jackson to chair the committee, which also includes Common Council member Sarah Salem of the Second Ward, where the former YMCA is located. Other members of the committee are city residents Tamoya Norwood, Sashawna Isaacs and Arthur T. Rollin; Paul Calogerakis, the city’s economic development director; and John Penney, the city’s community engagement director.

Links to the submissions are below:

To make a comment about the submissions, email [email protected]

City Receives Applicant Submissions for Reuse of Former YMCA Site

35 Montgomery Street (Former YMCA Facility)

The City of Poughkeepsie has released the applicant submissions it has received regarding possible future uses of the former YMCA property on Montgomery Street.

Here is a summary of the submissions:

The 35 Montgomery Community Coalition – which includes Community Matters 2, Inc., DAY ONE Early Childhood Learning Community, Dutchess Community College, Dutchess County, MASS Design Group, Nuvance Health, Poughkeepsie Farm Project, Poughkeepsie Public Library District, Vassar College, and YMCA of Kingston and Ulster County – is proposing a multi-use facility that would provide services connected to their respective missions in the community.

“Our proposal re-establishes the former YMCA site as a community and recreation resource that can be a safe, structured and horizon expanding space for Poughkeepsie’s youth and families,” the coalition wrote in a submission sent by Chris Kroner, principal of MASS Design Group.

“More than just a building, our proposal and the coalition behind it represent a comprehensive, cross-sector commitment to giving Poughkeepsie’s children the best possible start in life.”

Andrew Gori and Ambre Kelly, co-founders of The They Co., are proposing to establish a Poughkeepsie Museum of Contemporary Art. “Our 9 year history in revitalizing New York City and Los Angeles spaces and boroughs gives us great excitement to do the same in our hometown of Poughkeepsie, while also including a sensitivity to community retention that could serve as a model for future towns.”

Christopher Bledsoe, aquatic consultant at Swimming Past the Boundaries, is proposing The Swimming Past the Boundaries Aquatic Center (SPBAC), a 22,000-square-foot indoor aquatic facility that would “provide an asset to the immediate surrounding community and Dutchess County as a whole.”

Artist Carolyn Hutchings Edlund is proposing an Art Museum. “The newly available YMCA property would make an outstanding museum location having already the bones of the structure, parking, and surrounding parkland in which to display sculptures, host out-of-doors performing arts events.”

The submission date for ideas was Thursday Sept. 5. 

The city will hold a public information session at a later date to receive input about the plans from residents. The city also has appointed an advisory committee that includes members of the public to review the applications and make recommendations to the administration.

Links to the submissions are below:

Poughkeepsies’ Water Treatment Facility Will Get Upgrades

Working under a joint agreement, the City of Poughkeepsie and Town of Poughkeepsie own and operate the Poughkeepsies’ Water Treatment Facility, and they are continuing to make significant improvements to the plant.

The two municipalities are moving forward with an approximate $4.5 million project that will replace the facility’s UV disinfection equipment that helps to purify the water originating from the Hudson River.

Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison said, “We have spent millions of dollars on making sure the water that we take from the Hudson River is safe to drink. Working with other municipalities, we are taking more steps to protect the water at its source.  But the plant’s operation is imperative as well.”

Town of Poughkeepsie Supervisor Jon Baisley said, “The town is committed to doing its part to keep the plant operating in a safe and effective manner. These upgrades are part of larger commitment the Town and City have made to improve the water treatment facility.”

The city will put $2.5 million toward the project; the town will pay approximately $2 million.

The project is expected to begin in the fall and will take approximately two years to complete.

Poughkeepsies’ Joint Water Board has recommended certain improvements to the facility, including replacement of UV disinfection equipment.

“Ultraviolet water purification is our primary method for disinfecting pathogens from the water,” said Randy J. Alstadt, administrator of the Water Treatment Facility. “This is yet another major investment in our facility, to the betterment of our drinking water system.  The replacement is necessary because the manufacturer no longer supports the equipment. The new design is projected to save $90,000 annually in electric costs.”

The water treatment plant is located within the Marist College campus on property co-owned by the city and the town. The city has hired the engineering and environmental consulting firm Tighe & Bond as engineers for the project and is working with its state partners to identify grants that could help defray the costs of the upgrades.

 Over the past two decades, the city and town have spent approximately $40 million to improve the plant.