Archive for the "Police Reform & Reinvention Collaborative Plan" Category

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor, Police Chief Make Police Reform Presentation to Common Council

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison and Police Chief Tom Pape made a presentation about the city’s Police Reform & Modernization Collaborative plan to the Common Council on Monday night. They also announced that the plan is now available in English and Spanish and that copies in both languages can be found online at  https://cityofpoughkeepsie.com/policecollaborativeplan/ and at the Poughkeepsie Public Library District, 93 Market Street (Reference Desk on the Main Floor) and Boardman Road Branch Library, 141 Boardman Road (Checkout Desk).

In June 2020, Governor Cuomo signed Executive Order No. 203 — the “New York State Police Reform and Reinvention Collaborative” — requiring local police agencies to develop a plan to address policies, procedures, practices and deployment, including but not limited to the use of force. Governments with police agencies must adopt a plan by April 1 to be eligible for future state funding.

Mayor Rolison first asked the city’s Procedural Justice Committee to review the governor’s order, to gain public input and to make recommendations for the Mayor and Common Council to consider and act upon. The Committee — which includes police officers, other city officials and members of the public — made its recommendations in December after a series of meetings.

The Committee’s suggestions touched on a host of topics, including creating a civilian oversight board, bolstering additional mental health partnerships, improving the police department’s complaint form, creating more diversity in the ranks, increasing community policing and other matters. All of these issues are being addressed in the city’s plan.

The department intends to build on the tenets of Procedural Justice, which are:  Voice (Listen); Neutrality (Be fair); Respectful treatment (Be respectful) and Trustworthiness (Trying to do what’s best for the people).

The city released its preliminary proposals on Feb. 2 and held another public meeting on Feb. 10 for people to provide additional comments.

“Monday was yet another chance to present information to the public on this issue, and we appreciated the opportunity,” said Mayor Rob Rolison. “We believe we have produced a solid report that greatly exceeds the governor’s order. But, more to the point, the report is an excellent blueprint for additional police reforms and accountability by city government.”

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor, Police Chief Release Police Collaborative Plan in Response to Governor’s Executive Order

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison and Police Chief Tom Pape have released their plan in response to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Executive Order on police reforms. The report has been forwarded to the Common Council.

In June 2020, Governor Cuomo signed Executive Order No. 203 — the “New York State Police Reform and Reinvention Collaborative” — requiring local police agencies to develop a plan to address policies, procedures, practices and deployment, including but not limited to the use of force. Governments with police agencies must adopt a plan by April 1 to be eligible for future state funding.

Mayor Rolison first asked the city’s Procedural Justice Committee to review the governor’s order, to gain public input and to make recommendations for the Mayor and Common Council to consider and act upon. The Committee, which includes police officers, other city officials and members of the public, made its recommendations in December. The city released its preliminary plan on Feb. 2 and held another public meeting on Feb. 10 for people to provide further comments.

“This has been a solid and thorough process,” said Mayor Rob Rolison. “The Procedural Justice Committee did an exceptional job providing us with recommendations that we have incorporated into our report. The public feedback since then also has been helpful as we crafted our response to the governor.”

In October, the city created a webpage to keep the public informed of the progress, to provide pertinent information about the governor’s executive order, and to offer ways for the public to give more input.

The city has included the plan from the Mayor and Police Chief on a webpage devoted to the police collaborative issue, and for ease of public use has created a separate document that highlights the changes from the preliminary plan to the one released today.

The city has expanded on a number of issues, including accreditation, use of force policies, statistical transparency, warrant service and the Civilian Review Board.

“These were some of the specific issues raised at the last public meeting, and we are doing our level best to address them,” Chief Pape said. “It’s important for the public to realize this is an ongoing process. The Police Department has repeatedly demonstrated it will go forward with initiatives that improve policing, and we will hold to that commitment.”

Mayor Rolison and Chief Pape will discuss the plan at the Common Council virtual meeting at 6:30 p.m. on March 1.

City Holds Public Forum on Police Reform Initiative

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison and the co-chairs of Poughkeepsie Procedural Justice Committee hosted a public meeting to get feedback to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Executive Order pertaining to policing and enhanced training and policies. The virtual meeting took place Tuesday night. The public was given up to three minutes each to share their experiences and make suggestions. 

Police Reform & Modernization Collaborative Public Meeting – October 27, 2020

Earlier this month, Mayor Rolison named Common Council member Yvonne Flowers and Bishop Debra Gause co-chairs of the Procedural Justice Committee and asked the committee to review the executive order, to obtain public input and to make recommendations to the mayor and Common Council. City of Police Chief Tom Pape was among those listening to the participants in the forum, in addition to members of the Procedural Justice Committee.

In mid-June, Governor Cuomo signed Executive Order No. 203 — the “New York State Police Reform and Reinvention Collaborative” — requiring local police agencies to develop a plan and address policies, procedures, practices and deployment, including but not limited to the use of force. Governments with police agencies must adopt a plan by April 1, 2021, to be eligible for future state funding.

Mayor, Procedural Justice Committee Co-Chairs to Facilitate Public Meeting on Police Reforms

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison and the co-chairs of Poughkeepsie Procedural Justice Committee will host a public meeting to get feedback to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Executive Order pertaining to policing and enhanced training and policies.

The virtual meeting will take place from 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 27. People can register to speak and/or listen at http://bit.ly/pokpolicereform. The public will have up to three minutes each to share their experiences and make suggestions. Those who would like to participate in the virtual forums must register prior to the event’s start time.

Earlier this month, Mayor Rolison named Common Council member Yvonne Flowers and Bishop Debra Gause co-chairs of the Procedural Justice Committee and asked the committee to review the executive order, to obtain public input and to make recommendations to the mayor and Common Council. City of Police Chief Tom Pape will be among those listening to the participants in the forum, in addition to members of the Procedural Justice Committee.

“We are greatly looking forward to this forum,” said Mayor Rob Rolison. “The Procedural Justice Committee is in a great position to listen to the public’s concerns and views about policing and help the city as we formulate our response to the governor.”

Last year, the city formed the Procedural Committee — which includes police officers, other city officials and members of the public — to address community concerns related to police issues.

In mid-June, Governor Cuomo signed Executive Order No. 203 — the “New York State Police Reform and Reinvention Collaborative” — requiring local police agencies to develop a plan and address policies, procedures, practices and deployment, including but not limited to the use of force. Governments with police agencies must adopt a plan by April 1, 2021, to be eligible for future state funding.

To keep the public better informed about these matters, the city has created a webpage that provides pertinent information about the governor’s executive order and offers other ways for the public to give feedback, https://cityofpoughkeepsie.com/policecollaborativeplan/

City of Poughkeepsie Police Form Partnership With Mental Health of America of Dutchess County

The City of Poughkeepsie and Mental Health America of Dutchess County announced a pilot program today under which a behavioral health professional will partner with a police officer during shifts in order to broaden response services.

City of Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison and Andrew O’Grady, chief executive officer of Mental Health America, said this partnership will bring a significant benefit to the community.

“We recognize that our police officers respond to more than just reports of criminal activity,” said Mayor Rolison. “They are first responders who have to answer all sorts of calls, and many of them involve mental-health issues.”

The Mayor praised City Administrator Marc Nelson for bringing the idea forward.

 “This partnership with Mental Health America of Dutchess County will improve outcomes and provide a gateway to non-police services and help where it is needed, in real time,” said Nelson.  “The program will utilize non-personally identifiable data to actually measure community benefit. The whole idea is to address root problems in order to avoid a cycle of failure that often occurs when people are arrested and incarcerated.”

“We are excited to take this bold step with the City of Poughkeepsie,” said O’Grady. “We believe such alliances are going to grow, as communities look for more comprehensive approaches to how police officers handle cases involving mental illness and drug addiction.”

This partnership augments another one the city created with Dutchess County. Launched in October 2017, the Behavioral Evaluation & Assistance Team (BEAT) is a joint venture between City Police and the Dutchess County’s Department of Behavioral & Community Health. As a result, the city has significantly increased the number of personal interactions with individuals and have rendered more assistance.

“Our department continues to embrace ways to serve the public, to provide safety but also to provide assistance for those who need it,” said Police Chief Tom Pape.

An Intensive Case Manager from Mental Health America will work under the Police Department’s Juvenile Division and will work closely with the BEAT team as well as the Police Department’s Juvenile Division Youth Worker to meet the needs of children and their parents who may be experiencing mental-health-related illnesses. MHA’s social worker also will be able to provide or offer referrals for follow-up services.

Mayor Rolison said he plans to use existing police funds to launch the program at the end of this month and will include more monies for it in his 2021 budget proposal to the Common Council.